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Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

5 edition of Laboratory-acquired infections found in the catalog.

Laboratory-acquired infections

history, incidence, causes, and prevention

by C. H. Collins

  • 295 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Butterworth-Heinemann in Oxford, Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Laboratory infections.,
  • Laboratory Infection.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 272-312) and index.

    StatementC.H. Collins and D.A. Kennedy.
    ContributionsKennedy, D. A.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQR64.7 .C65 1999
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 324 p. :
    Number of Pages324
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL371591M
    ISBN 100750640235
    LC Control Number98032458

      Brucellosis is one of the most common laboratory-acquired infections, mostly because aerosolization is a mechanism of transmission in this setting. We report an exposure to Brucella melitensis that occurred in a large microbiology laboratory and describe the strategy chosen for antibiotic prophylaxis and serological follow-up of exposed by: Get this from a library! Laboratory-acquired infections: history, incidence, causes, and prevention. [C H Collins].

    Types of exposures associated with laboratory-acquired infections Route Microbiological practice/accident Ingestion Mouth pipetting Splashes into mouth Contaminated articles or fingers placed in mouth Consumption of food or drink in workplace Inoculation Needlestick accidents Cuts from sharp objects Contamination of skin and Spills/splashes on Cited by: 5. Laboratory-acquired infections --How laboratory infections are acquired --Classification of microorganisms on the basis of hazard and laboratories on the basis of use --Minimizing equipment and technique-related hazards --Microbiological safety cabinets --Collection, transport and receipt of infectious materials --Decontamination --Laboratory.

    module Resource Book c risk analysis 2 Biological hazards, or biohazards-are those infectious agents or hazardous biological materials that present a risk, or potential risk, to the health of humans, animals or other organisms. The risk can be manifested directly through infection, orFile Size: 1MB. Herein, we reviewed laboratory-acquired infections (LAIs) along with their health-related biological risks to provide an evidence base to tackle biosafety/biosecurity and biocontainment issues. Over the past years, a broad spectrum of pathogenic agents, such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, parasites, or genetically modified organisms, have been described and gained a Cited by: 3.


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Laboratory-acquired infections by C. H. Collins Download PDF EPUB FB2

Laboratory-acquired Infections continues to be the source book of information for all those working in or affiliated with microbiological laboratories. British Journal of Science Reviews from the fourth an extremely useful text for anyone running a routine or research laboratory. Journal of Medical Microbiology, No.

11, NAuthors: D Kennedy, C Collins. Laboratory-acquired Infections: History, Incidence, Causes and Prevention Hardcover – January 1, by C. Collins (Author)Cited by: Book Description: A new edition of this comprehensive manual on causes and prevention of laboratory-acquired infections, for laboratory personnel and managers.

The two authors have thoroughly revised this established text, to include the recent developments in infections and agents, and current European regulations and recommendations. This chapter describes the history and epidemiology (including behavioral characteristics) of laboratory-acquired infections and describes the programs, procedures, provisions and practices, and requirements (including risk management) in Cited by: 1.

accidents ACDP aerosols agents airflow autoclave bacteria bench biological biological safety cabinets Biosafety Level blood bottles British Standard brucellosis buckets cabinet air centrifuge Class II cabinets clinical laboratories Code of Practice Collins Containment Level culture Darlow decontamination DHSS discard jars disease disinfectant.

If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive. Laboratory-acquired Infections: History, Incidence, Causes and Preventions, 4th edition. Eds. Collins and D.

: Nigel Hill. LABORATORY-ACQUIRED INFECTIONS. 1 Chairman, Committee on Laboratory Infections and Accidents, American Public Health Association. To further the work of this Committee, investigators are urged to report instances of laboratory infections and accidents to Cited by:   Although cutaneous infections due to accidental inoculation are documented, most laboratory-acquired infections are caused by inhalation of infectious conidia from the mold form, resulting in pulmonary infection.

The mere lifting of a culture plate lid often suffices to cause the release of large numbers of conidia, Cited by: Laboratory-acquired infections due to a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites have been described.

Although the precise risk of infection after. Infection to someone Outside workplace B K d L H di L b t A i d I f ti Tertiary LAI Infection transmitted from 2y. Byers, K and L. Harding. Laboratory Acquired Infections In Biological Safety, Principles and Practices, 5th edition, D.

Wooley andeditors. ASM Size: KB. Laboratory-Acquired Infections Karen Byers, RBP, CBSP Biosafety O!cer Dana Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA Monday, Octo File Size: 2MB. "Laboratory-Acquired Infections" is a source-book of information for all those working in or affiliated with microbiological laboratories.

show more Product details2/5(1). Laboratory-acquired Infections continues to be the source book of information for all those working in or affiliated with microbiological laboratories. The fourth edition of one of the premium books of biosafety managements shows further development whilst remaining an enjoyable, very readable and highly informative text.5/5(1).

Download Citation | Laboratory-acquired Infections: History, Incidence, Causes and Preventions, 4th ed. | This is the fourth edition of this excellent book, which is found on the shelves of most. Laboratory-acquired infections are still a real threat in traditional microbiology and clinical laboratories.

Reports about biotechnology and bioengineering laboratory accidents and infections are scarce compared to traditional microbiology and clinical laboratory accidents and infections (Kimman et al., ).

However, if the prevalence is so Cited by: Laboratory-Acquired Infection (LAI) Database. Search Tips. You can search partial terms using the asterisk (*) example: pseud* For the Biosafety and Biosecurity Professional.

- For the Biosafety and Biosecurity Professional. Loading For the Biosafety and Biosecurity Professional. Laboratory-acquired infections due to a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites have been described. Although the precise risk of infection after an exposure remains poorly defined, surveys of laboratory-acquired infections suggest that.

Laboratory-acquired Infections continues to be the source book of information for all those working in or affiliated with microbiological laboratories. British Journal of Author: C Collins, D Kennedy. This chapter talks about laboratory biosafety and its goals that include prevention of laboratory-acquired infections in workers and accidental releases of live agents which can potentially endanger and have severe negative impact on humans, animals, and plants.

Laboratory safety involves all aspects of the laboratory cycle, starting from before microorganisms arrive in the Cited by: 8. Laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease is a documented but infrequent hazard to laboratory workers.

Meningococcal isolates recovered from sterile sites (e.g., blood and cerebrospinal fluid [CSF]) may have increased risk of infection for clinical by: 9. The book is full of practical advice on avoiding laboratory hazards, such as aerosol generation and sharps injury, as relevant now as in the days before disposable equipment and test formats.

It also provides a fascinating list of published reports of laboratory acquired infections and is the standard UK reference source for by: 3.The 5th edition of Biological Safety: Principles and Practices is still the leading comprehensive biosafety textbook available and is a page-turner as book extensively covers the identification, assessment, and management of biological hazards, as well as special environments as they relate to biohazardous substances.Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae W H O M a n ua l, 2n d E d i t iOn1 1 The first edition has the WHO reference WHO/CDS/CSR/EDC/ Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and .