Last edited by Gujind
Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

9 edition of Algonquin legends found in the catalog.

Algonquin legends

by Charles Godfrey Leland

  • 157 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Dover Publications in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • New England.
    • Subjects:
    • Algonquian Indians -- Folklore.,
    • Algonquian mythology.,
    • Folklore -- New England.

    • Edition Notes

      Originally published: The Algonquin legends of New England. Boston : Houghton, Mifflin, 1884.

      StatementCharles G. Leland.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE99.A35 L44 1992
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxv, 379 p. :
      Number of Pages379
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1552305M
      ISBN 100486269442
      LC Control Number91032204
      OCLC/WorldCa24504385

        Myths and legends provide unique and authentic sources of knowledge about our deepest instincts and ways of interpreting the world and our place in it. This volume remains one of the most powerful and revealing studies of the Algonquin versions of such myths, a thorough, comprehensive collection that will prove invaluable to any student of American Indian culture or myth, folklore, and Brand: Dover Publications. This book is annotated with a rare biographical sketch of the author, written by Elizabeth Robins Pennell. This work contains a collection of the myths, legends, and folk-lore of the principal Wabanaki, or Northeastern Algonquin, Indians; that is to say, of the Passamaquoddies and Penobscots of Maine, and of the Micmacs of New Brunswick.

        It may be observed that the fight with horns is explained in another legend in this book, called the Chenoo, and that these horns are the magic horns of the Chepitch calm, or Great Serpent, who is somewhat like the dragon. In the Algonquin story, two Loons are Glooskap's "tale-bearers," which occasion him great anxiety by their prolonged absences. Algonquin legends. [Charles Godfrey Leland] -- A collection of myths, legends, and folklore from the Wabanaki, or northeastern Algonquin Indians. Your Web browser is not enabled for JavaScript. Some features of WorldCat will not be available.

      In his book The Algonquin Legends of New England Leland attempts to link Wabanki culture and history to the Norse. It has also come to light that Leland altered some of those folk tales in order to lend credence to his : 15 August , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Legends and Folklore: The Algonquin Legends Of New England Leland, Charles G. (Houghton, ) Myths of the Abenakis gathered by the author from the descendants of a tribe that once lived in the state. The Connecticut Hard, Walter R. (Rinehart, ) Legends .


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Algonquin legends by Charles Godfrey Leland Download PDF EPUB FB2

Leland has a rare sense for the profound significance of the myths he relates, and thus one forgives him any archaisms, which are as nothing compared to the fact that he places the Algonquin religion shoulder to shoulder with any of the other great world religions, /5.

ALGONQUIN LEGENDS [Charles G. Leland] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. In the Algonquin story, two Loons are Glooskap's "tale-bearers," which occasion him great anxiety Algonquin legends book their prolonged absences. This is distinctly stated in the Indian legend, as it is of Odin's birds in the Edda.

Odin has, as news-bringers, two ravens. "Hugin and Munin Fly each day over the spacious earth. I fear for Hugin that he comes not back,Brand: Dover Publications. This book is annotated with a rare biographical sketch of the author, written by Elizabeth Robins Pennell.

This work contains a collection of the myths, legends, and folk-lore of the principal. Originally published: The Algonquin legends of New England. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, Pages: A brilliant collection of stories from the folklore tradition of the Algonquin (Algonquian, Algonkin) peoples of North America, in particular, as the subtitle tells us, of the "Micmac, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot tribes".

The Algonquin legends of New England; or, Myths and folk lore of the Micmac, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot tribes by Leland, Charles Godfrey, Pages: Founded inAlgonquin Books is an independent publisher of literary fiction and narrative nonfiction. Offices in Chapel Hill, NC, and New York City.

After his law studies were completed, Leland became a journalist, working for such periodicals as P.T. Barnum's Illustrated News, Vanity Fair, and Graham's Magazine. The mid-to-late s were very eventful for Leland; he published his first book, Meister Karl's Sketch-Book in and married Eliza Bella Fisher in Myths and legends provide unique and authentic sources of knowledge about our deepest instincts and ways of interpreting the world and our place in it.

This volume remains one of the most powerful and revealing studies of the Algonquin versions of such myths, a thorough, comprehensive collection that will prove invaluable to any student of American Indian culture or myth, folklore, and religion. Algonquin legend about Michabo rebuilding the earth after a flood.

About The Algonquin Myth of Michabo: Anthropology article analyzing the Algonquin Michabou legends. Recommended Books of Related Native American Legends Great Rabbit and the Long-Tailed Wildcat: Children's book illustrating an Algonquin legend about Wildcat unwisely picking a.

Algonquin Legends (Native American Ser.) View larger image. By: Charles G. Leland. Read Now. Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with.

these Wabanaki, or Northeastern Algonquin, legends give, with few exceptions, in full and coherently, many tales which have only reached us in a broken, imperfect form, from other sources.

This work, then, contains a collection of the myths, legends, and folk-lore of the principal Wabanaki, or Northeastern Algonquin, Indians; that is to. The Algonquin legends of New England: or, Myths and folk lore of the Micmac, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot tribes 11 editions By Charles Godfrey Leland Go to the editions section to read or download ebooks.

A pretty legend of the Chippeways, an Algonquian tribe, tells how Algon, a hunter, won for his bride the daughter of a star.

While walking over the prairies he discovered a circular pathway, worn as if by the tread of many feet, though there were no foot-marks visible outside its bounds. It may be observed that the fight with horns is explained in another legend in this book, called the Chenoo, and that these horns are the magic horns of the Chepitch calm, or Great Serpent, who is somewhat like the dragon.

In the Algonquin story, two Loons are Glooskap's "tale-bearers," which occasion him great anxiety by their prolonged absences. The Algonquin Legends Of New England: Or Myths And Folk Lore Of The Micmac, Passamaquoddy, And Penobscot Tribes This book is a result of an effort made by us towards making a contribution to the preservation and repair of original classic literature.

In an attempt to preserve, improve and recreate the original content, we have worked towards: 1. algonquin legends Download algonquin legends or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get algonquin legends book now.

This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want. the algonquin legends of new england; preface. authorities. contents. introduction; list of illustrations. mik um wess, the indian puck, or robin good-fellow; introduction; the algonquin legends of new england.

the merry tales of lox, the mischief maker, the amazing adventures of master rabbit; the chenoo legends. thunder stories; at-o-sis, the. Illustrated. This is Charles Lelands' able retelling of the Algonquin mythology, particularly tales of the culture hero, : Charles G. Leland.

There's no description for this book yet. Can you add one? Edition Notes Originally published: The Algonquin legends of New England. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, Classifications Dewey Decimal Class / Library of Congress EA35 L44 The Physical Object Pagination xv, p.: Author: Charles Godfrey Leland.This book is a collection of articles featuring the Algonquin people.

The Algonquin, whose population number 7, occupy today the Ottawa valley and the Abitibi-Temiscamingue region in Quebec. Nine authors have written as many essays dealing with different traditional and contemporary issues.The wendigo (/ ˈ w ɛ n d ɪ ɡ oʊ /)(also wetiko) is a mythological creature or evil spirit from the folklore of the First Nations Algonquian tribes based in the northern forests of Nova Scotia, the East Coast of Canada, and Great Lakes Region of Canada and the United States.

The wendigo is described as a monster with some characteristics of a human or as a spirit who has possessed a human Grouping: Legendary creature.